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Watch this video to learn how to use a ruler to make measurements in woodworking.

The purpose of this video is to inculcate knowledge and professionalism in the field of woodworking.

Don't forget to watch the previous videos on taking measurements and marking the layout on your woodwork.

This video will show you how to choose the correct ruler for your project and use it to ensure your materials are measured accurately.

Music - Gilles B

In this video you will learn how to use a Ruler.

A ruler is a hand tool used for measuring distances and marking lines on wood.

The tools that you will need are a ruler, a pencil, a marking knife and a piece of wood.

The ruler, also known as Rule or Line Gauge, is strip a of wood, metal or plastic with a reliable straight edge.

It is calibrated in inches, centimeters and milimeters.

Carpenters generally prefer using steel rulers as the graduations etched into the steel allows for a more reliable reading.

For portable use and rough measurement, you can use a Folding Rule.

A folding Rule is a series of connected rulers that unfold to form a longer edge.

A ruler can be held in different ways, depending on what is convenient.

Place the ruler flat on a piece of wood.

Now, use a pencil to mark a line at the desired position.

If the wooden piece is small hold the ruler with the thumb.

If the wooden piece is bigger, suppor the ruler with your remaining fingers.

For accuracy, avoid using a small ruler for longer measurements and vice versa.

Use different sizes of rulers depending on the measured distance.

Always read the markings of the ruler with your eyes exactly above it.

Viewing a graduation sideways will lead to inaccurate measurement.

Always recheck the taken measurement to be sure of it.

Graduations on rulers are extremely close to one another and reading mistakes can be common.

You have now learnt how to use a ruler.

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