Rollerblading Uphill and Downhill

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Learn how to adapt your skating style when blading up and downhill

Find more inline skating videos on our website in the full rollerblading program

Inline skating can be a great way to stay in shape

Music : Alter K

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Hannah Thompson - Sikana
Hannah Thompson
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In this video, you will learn how to tackle uphill and downhill slopes when inline skating.

On a flat surface, your stride will be regular, rhythmic and sequenced.

However, when you come to a path which is not flat , you should adapt your glide according to these two situations: ascending and descending a slope.

Firstly, skating uphill.

To tackle an incline, increase the frequency of your weight transfer from one leg to the other.

Spread your feet slightly wider in a 'V' shape and push off harder towards the exterior.

Adopt a more energetic and vigorous stride at a faster pace

Be sure to keep your shins resting on the tongues of your skates in the ready position and don't lean forwards.

Keep your arms mobile and bent, with your head lifted, to maximise your field of vision.

Secondly, skating downhill.

As you approach the downhill slope, don't let your gaze drop to the floor.

On the contrary, keep your head up and your field of vision open. Get into the 'ready position', with your shins resting on the tongues of your skates.

Keep your head lifted and your gaze forwards.

Use the heel brake to control your speed.

To learn more about this type of braking, you can watch our video on braking with the heel brake.

Extend your leg more or less to exert more or less pressure on the brake.

Stay alert, but keep your stance flexible.

If you find the slope too steep, whether uphill or downhill, take off your skates, walk to the end of the difficult section then put your skates back on!

Over to you!

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